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And only one judge ranked "From Here to Eternity" at the top; from the acocunt above, it seems like it was a compromise choice, rather than the most outstanding book. Other literary items include a standard library edition of "The Call of the Wild" with an inscription from Jack London to one of the brothers who brought the dog Buck on their mining trip to the Klondike (,000 to ,000); a first ediion, with dust jacket, of Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird"; a first edition of "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" by Roald Dahl (

And only one judge ranked "From Here to Eternity" at the top; from the acocunt above, it seems like it was a compromise choice, rather than the most outstanding book. Other literary items include a standard library edition of "The Call of the Wild" with an inscription from Jack London to one of the brothers who brought the dog Buck on their mining trip to the Klondike ($4,000 to $6,000); a first ediion, with dust jacket, of Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird"; a first edition of "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" by Roald Dahl ($1,000 to $2,000); a first edition of Louisa May Alcott's "Little Women" ($800 to $1,200); an advance copy of Joseph Heller's "Catch-22" ($500 to 700); two letters by Samuel Clemens, one signed "Clemes" ($3,000 to $5,000) and one signed "Mark Twain" ($10,000 to $15,000), both very funny; a typed letter signed by Raymond Chandler from 1951 ($2,500 to $3,000); and an autographed note by "Dracula" author Bram Stoker ($400 to $600). -- Carolyn Kellogg Top photo: First editions of William Faulkner's "Mosquitos" and F. Scott Fitzgerald's "The Beautiful and the Damned." Credit: Carolyn Kellogg. Hazel Glass Company, Washington, PA (began 1887) and Atlas Glass Company, also of Washington, PA (began 1896) merged to form the Hazel-Atlas Glass Company, Wheeling, WV, in 1902. (In my own opinion, it is likely, or at least very possible, that the “H over A” mark continued to appear on some containers produced after 1964, since a very large number of molds were then in use, and it would have been a considerable endeavor just to make minor re-tooling changes on all of those molds to erase or replace the makers mark.) Tremendous numbers of white milkglass liners (the miniature round glass plates or “saucers” that fit inside zinc screw-threaded lids made for Mason-style fruit jars) were produced, as well as canning jars (fruit jars) including the jars for general household use; “packer ware” (generic containers for a multitude of common food products such as mayonnaise, spaghetti sauce, mustard, jams and jellies, coffee, peanut butter, applesauce, etc, as well as non-food items like cosmetics, salves, medicines, chemical liquids), as well as a wide variety of other containers for products of every description.

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And only one judge ranked "From Here to Eternity" at the top; from the acocunt above, it seems like it was a compromise choice, rather than the most outstanding book. Other literary items include a standard library edition of "The Call of the Wild" with an inscription from Jack London to one of the brothers who brought the dog Buck on their mining trip to the Klondike ($4,000 to $6,000); a first ediion, with dust jacket, of Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird"; a first edition of "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" by Roald Dahl ($1,000 to $2,000); a first edition of Louisa May Alcott's "Little Women" ($800 to $1,200); an advance copy of Joseph Heller's "Catch-22" ($500 to 700); two letters by Samuel Clemens, one signed "Clemes" ($3,000 to $5,000) and one signed "Mark Twain" ($10,000 to $15,000), both very funny; a typed letter signed by Raymond Chandler from 1951 ($2,500 to $3,000); and an autographed note by "Dracula" author Bram Stoker ($400 to $600).

-- Carolyn Kellogg Top photo: First editions of William Faulkner's "Mosquitos" and F.

Scott Fitzgerald's "The Beautiful and the Damned." Credit: Carolyn Kellogg.

Hazel Glass Company, Washington, PA (began 1887) and Atlas Glass Company, also of Washington, PA (began 1896) merged to form the Hazel-Atlas Glass Company, Wheeling, WV, in 1902. (In my own opinion, it is likely, or at least very possible, that the “H over A” mark continued to appear on some containers produced after 1964, since a very large number of molds were then in use, and it would have been a considerable endeavor just to make minor re-tooling changes on all of those molds to erase or replace the makers mark.) Tremendous numbers of white milkglass liners (the miniature round glass plates or “saucers” that fit inside zinc screw-threaded lids made for Mason-style fruit jars) were produced, as well as canning jars (fruit jars) including the jars for general household use; “packer ware” (generic containers for a multitude of common food products such as mayonnaise, spaghetti sauce, mustard, jams and jellies, coffee, peanut butter, applesauce, etc, as well as non-food items like cosmetics, salves, medicines, chemical liquids), as well as a wide variety of other containers for products of every description.

A first edition of Ernest Hemingway's "The Sun Also Rises," complete with its original 1926 dust jacket, is expected to sell for quite a bit more: $25,000 to $35,000.

Two of James Joyce's masterworks are also up for auction: a first trade edition of "Finnegan's Wake" ($800 to $1,200) and an original cloth edition of "Ulysses," one of 425 copies signed by James Joyce ($5,000 to $7,000).

Among the pieces that will be auctioned Monday are first editions of William Faulkner's "Mosquito" and F.

,000 to ,000); a first edition of Louisa May Alcott's "Little Women" (0 to

And only one judge ranked "From Here to Eternity" at the top; from the acocunt above, it seems like it was a compromise choice, rather than the most outstanding book. Other literary items include a standard library edition of "The Call of the Wild" with an inscription from Jack London to one of the brothers who brought the dog Buck on their mining trip to the Klondike ($4,000 to $6,000); a first ediion, with dust jacket, of Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird"; a first edition of "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" by Roald Dahl ($1,000 to $2,000); a first edition of Louisa May Alcott's "Little Women" ($800 to $1,200); an advance copy of Joseph Heller's "Catch-22" ($500 to 700); two letters by Samuel Clemens, one signed "Clemes" ($3,000 to $5,000) and one signed "Mark Twain" ($10,000 to $15,000), both very funny; a typed letter signed by Raymond Chandler from 1951 ($2,500 to $3,000); and an autographed note by "Dracula" author Bram Stoker ($400 to $600). -- Carolyn Kellogg Top photo: First editions of William Faulkner's "Mosquitos" and F. Scott Fitzgerald's "The Beautiful and the Damned." Credit: Carolyn Kellogg. Hazel Glass Company, Washington, PA (began 1887) and Atlas Glass Company, also of Washington, PA (began 1896) merged to form the Hazel-Atlas Glass Company, Wheeling, WV, in 1902. (In my own opinion, it is likely, or at least very possible, that the “H over A” mark continued to appear on some containers produced after 1964, since a very large number of molds were then in use, and it would have been a considerable endeavor just to make minor re-tooling changes on all of those molds to erase or replace the makers mark.) Tremendous numbers of white milkglass liners (the miniature round glass plates or “saucers” that fit inside zinc screw-threaded lids made for Mason-style fruit jars) were produced, as well as canning jars (fruit jars) including the jars for general household use; “packer ware” (generic containers for a multitude of common food products such as mayonnaise, spaghetti sauce, mustard, jams and jellies, coffee, peanut butter, applesauce, etc, as well as non-food items like cosmetics, salves, medicines, chemical liquids), as well as a wide variety of other containers for products of every description.

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And only one judge ranked "From Here to Eternity" at the top; from the acocunt above, it seems like it was a compromise choice, rather than the most outstanding book. Other literary items include a standard library edition of "The Call of the Wild" with an inscription from Jack London to one of the brothers who brought the dog Buck on their mining trip to the Klondike ($4,000 to $6,000); a first ediion, with dust jacket, of Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird"; a first edition of "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" by Roald Dahl ($1,000 to $2,000); a first edition of Louisa May Alcott's "Little Women" ($800 to $1,200); an advance copy of Joseph Heller's "Catch-22" ($500 to 700); two letters by Samuel Clemens, one signed "Clemes" ($3,000 to $5,000) and one signed "Mark Twain" ($10,000 to $15,000), both very funny; a typed letter signed by Raymond Chandler from 1951 ($2,500 to $3,000); and an autographed note by "Dracula" author Bram Stoker ($400 to $600).

-- Carolyn Kellogg Top photo: First editions of William Faulkner's "Mosquitos" and F.

Scott Fitzgerald's "The Beautiful and the Damned." Credit: Carolyn Kellogg.

Hazel Glass Company, Washington, PA (began 1887) and Atlas Glass Company, also of Washington, PA (began 1896) merged to form the Hazel-Atlas Glass Company, Wheeling, WV, in 1902. (In my own opinion, it is likely, or at least very possible, that the “H over A” mark continued to appear on some containers produced after 1964, since a very large number of molds were then in use, and it would have been a considerable endeavor just to make minor re-tooling changes on all of those molds to erase or replace the makers mark.) Tremendous numbers of white milkglass liners (the miniature round glass plates or “saucers” that fit inside zinc screw-threaded lids made for Mason-style fruit jars) were produced, as well as canning jars (fruit jars) including the jars for general household use; “packer ware” (generic containers for a multitude of common food products such as mayonnaise, spaghetti sauce, mustard, jams and jellies, coffee, peanut butter, applesauce, etc, as well as non-food items like cosmetics, salves, medicines, chemical liquids), as well as a wide variety of other containers for products of every description.

A first edition of Ernest Hemingway's "The Sun Also Rises," complete with its original 1926 dust jacket, is expected to sell for quite a bit more: $25,000 to $35,000.

Two of James Joyce's masterworks are also up for auction: a first trade edition of "Finnegan's Wake" ($800 to $1,200) and an original cloth edition of "Ulysses," one of 425 copies signed by James Joyce ($5,000 to $7,000).

Among the pieces that will be auctioned Monday are first editions of William Faulkner's "Mosquito" and F.

,200); an advance copy of Joseph Heller's "Catch-22" (0 to 700); two letters by Samuel Clemens, one signed "Clemes" (,000 to ,000) and one signed "Mark Twain" (,000 to ,000), both very funny; a typed letter signed by Raymond Chandler from 1951 (,500 to ,000); and an autographed note by "Dracula" author Bram Stoker (0 to 0).

-- Carolyn Kellogg Top photo: First editions of William Faulkner's "Mosquitos" and F.

Scott Fitzgerald's "The Beautiful and the Damned." Credit: Carolyn Kellogg.

Hazel Glass Company, Washington, PA (began 1887) and Atlas Glass Company, also of Washington, PA (began 1896) merged to form the Hazel-Atlas Glass Company, Wheeling, WV, in 1902. (In my own opinion, it is likely, or at least very possible, that the “H over A” mark continued to appear on some containers produced after 1964, since a very large number of molds were then in use, and it would have been a considerable endeavor just to make minor re-tooling changes on all of those molds to erase or replace the makers mark.) Tremendous numbers of white milkglass liners (the miniature round glass plates or “saucers” that fit inside zinc screw-threaded lids made for Mason-style fruit jars) were produced, as well as canning jars (fruit jars) including the jars for general household use; “packer ware” (generic containers for a multitude of common food products such as mayonnaise, spaghetti sauce, mustard, jams and jellies, coffee, peanut butter, applesauce, etc, as well as non-food items like cosmetics, salves, medicines, chemical liquids), as well as a wide variety of other containers for products of every description.

A first edition of Ernest Hemingway's "The Sun Also Rises," complete with its original 1926 dust jacket, is expected to sell for quite a bit more: ,000 to ,000.

Two of James Joyce's masterworks are also up for auction: a first trade edition of "Finnegan's Wake" (0 to

And only one judge ranked "From Here to Eternity" at the top; from the acocunt above, it seems like it was a compromise choice, rather than the most outstanding book. Other literary items include a standard library edition of "The Call of the Wild" with an inscription from Jack London to one of the brothers who brought the dog Buck on their mining trip to the Klondike ($4,000 to $6,000); a first ediion, with dust jacket, of Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird"; a first edition of "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" by Roald Dahl ($1,000 to $2,000); a first edition of Louisa May Alcott's "Little Women" ($800 to $1,200); an advance copy of Joseph Heller's "Catch-22" ($500 to 700); two letters by Samuel Clemens, one signed "Clemes" ($3,000 to $5,000) and one signed "Mark Twain" ($10,000 to $15,000), both very funny; a typed letter signed by Raymond Chandler from 1951 ($2,500 to $3,000); and an autographed note by "Dracula" author Bram Stoker ($400 to $600). -- Carolyn Kellogg Top photo: First editions of William Faulkner's "Mosquitos" and F. Scott Fitzgerald's "The Beautiful and the Damned." Credit: Carolyn Kellogg. Hazel Glass Company, Washington, PA (began 1887) and Atlas Glass Company, also of Washington, PA (began 1896) merged to form the Hazel-Atlas Glass Company, Wheeling, WV, in 1902. (In my own opinion, it is likely, or at least very possible, that the “H over A” mark continued to appear on some containers produced after 1964, since a very large number of molds were then in use, and it would have been a considerable endeavor just to make minor re-tooling changes on all of those molds to erase or replace the makers mark.) Tremendous numbers of white milkglass liners (the miniature round glass plates or “saucers” that fit inside zinc screw-threaded lids made for Mason-style fruit jars) were produced, as well as canning jars (fruit jars) including the jars for general household use; “packer ware” (generic containers for a multitude of common food products such as mayonnaise, spaghetti sauce, mustard, jams and jellies, coffee, peanut butter, applesauce, etc, as well as non-food items like cosmetics, salves, medicines, chemical liquids), as well as a wide variety of other containers for products of every description.

||

And only one judge ranked "From Here to Eternity" at the top; from the acocunt above, it seems like it was a compromise choice, rather than the most outstanding book. Other literary items include a standard library edition of "The Call of the Wild" with an inscription from Jack London to one of the brothers who brought the dog Buck on their mining trip to the Klondike ($4,000 to $6,000); a first ediion, with dust jacket, of Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird"; a first edition of "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" by Roald Dahl ($1,000 to $2,000); a first edition of Louisa May Alcott's "Little Women" ($800 to $1,200); an advance copy of Joseph Heller's "Catch-22" ($500 to 700); two letters by Samuel Clemens, one signed "Clemes" ($3,000 to $5,000) and one signed "Mark Twain" ($10,000 to $15,000), both very funny; a typed letter signed by Raymond Chandler from 1951 ($2,500 to $3,000); and an autographed note by "Dracula" author Bram Stoker ($400 to $600).

-- Carolyn Kellogg Top photo: First editions of William Faulkner's "Mosquitos" and F.

Scott Fitzgerald's "The Beautiful and the Damned." Credit: Carolyn Kellogg.

Hazel Glass Company, Washington, PA (began 1887) and Atlas Glass Company, also of Washington, PA (began 1896) merged to form the Hazel-Atlas Glass Company, Wheeling, WV, in 1902. (In my own opinion, it is likely, or at least very possible, that the “H over A” mark continued to appear on some containers produced after 1964, since a very large number of molds were then in use, and it would have been a considerable endeavor just to make minor re-tooling changes on all of those molds to erase or replace the makers mark.) Tremendous numbers of white milkglass liners (the miniature round glass plates or “saucers” that fit inside zinc screw-threaded lids made for Mason-style fruit jars) were produced, as well as canning jars (fruit jars) including the jars for general household use; “packer ware” (generic containers for a multitude of common food products such as mayonnaise, spaghetti sauce, mustard, jams and jellies, coffee, peanut butter, applesauce, etc, as well as non-food items like cosmetics, salves, medicines, chemical liquids), as well as a wide variety of other containers for products of every description.

A first edition of Ernest Hemingway's "The Sun Also Rises," complete with its original 1926 dust jacket, is expected to sell for quite a bit more: $25,000 to $35,000.

Two of James Joyce's masterworks are also up for auction: a first trade edition of "Finnegan's Wake" ($800 to $1,200) and an original cloth edition of "Ulysses," one of 425 copies signed by James Joyce ($5,000 to $7,000).

Among the pieces that will be auctioned Monday are first editions of William Faulkner's "Mosquito" and F.

,200) and an original cloth edition of "Ulysses," one of 425 copies signed by James Joyce (,000 to ,000).

Among the pieces that will be auctioned Monday are first editions of William Faulkner's "Mosquito" and F.

Schlesinger, Adlai Stevenson and Mark Van Doren), for a book geek it's fascinating to see the inner workings of the National Book Awards.

Hazel Atlas Florentine No 1 dinner plate, circa 1932-1935. I have noticed items listed for sale by dealers and sellers at antique malls, flea markets (and other venues such as ebay) with labels indicating Anchor Hocking.

Anchor Hocking Glass Corporation used an “Anchor logo superimposed over an H” or an “Anchor inside a rectangle”.

Codes on bases of H-A bottles: Many of the Hazel-Atlas containers I have seen do not conform exactly to this chart, but this might be of some help in interpreting the markings on of their products.

This chart is probably from a trade publication of the 1950s: Chart of Hazel-Atlas base codes on containers, courtesy of

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The “H over smaller A” mark is stated to have been used beginning in 1923, according to patent/trademark information published in “400 Trademarks on Glass” (1968) by Arthur G. The Hazel-Atlas mark sometimes varies slightly in exact appearance, especially on small bottles where there was little room to engrave the mark into the mold, but in general it is quite easily recognizable on the majority of glass items.